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Brave Girl: Clara and the Shirtwaist Makers' Strike of 1909
Contributor(s): Markel, Michelle, Sweet, Melissa (Illustrator)
ISBN: 0061804428     ISBN-13: 9780061804427
Publisher: Balzer & Bray
    OUR PRICE: $16.20  
Product Type: Hardcover - Other Formats
Published: January 2013
Qty:
Annotation: An illustrated account of immigrant Clara Lemlich's pivotal role in the influential 1909 women laborer's strike describes how she worked grueling hours to acquire an education and support her family before organizing a massive walkout to protest the unfair working conditions in New York's garment district.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Shirtwaist Makers' Strike, New York, N.Y., 1909; Juvenile literature.
Strikes and lockouts; Clothing trade; New York (State); New York; Juvenile literature.
Women clothing workers; New York (State); New York; Juvenile literature.
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Nonfiction | People & Places | United States
Dewey: 331.892/88711509747109041
LCCN: 2012025439
Lexile Measure: 760
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 1-2, Age 6-7
Book type: Easy Non Fiction
Physical Information: 11.00" H x 9.00" W x 0.50" (0.84 lbs)
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 156055
Reading Level: 5.0   Interest Level: Lower Grades   Point Value: 0.5
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q59755
Reading Level: 3.6   Interest Level: Grades K-2   Point Value: 2.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2013 Fall)
In her simple but powerful text Markel shows how multiple arrests, physical attacks, and misogyny failed to deter Clara Lemlich as she set off on her lifelong path as a union activist in the early twentieth century. Clara's story is accentuated by Sweet's vivid illustrations, many of which are presented on fabric scraps or torn paper with borders of machine stitching. Bib.

Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2013 #1)
The plight of early-twentieth-century female garment workers is brought to life in this biography of labor leader Clara Lemlich. To escape persecution in their native Ukraine, the Jewish Lemlichs immigrated to New York City, where young Clara quickly found work in a shirtwaist factory. Outraged by the dangerous and unfair working conditions, Clara successfully instigated a citywide strike. In her simple but powerful text Markel shows how multiple arrests, serious physical attacks, and endless misogyny failed to deter this remarkable woman as she set off on her lifelong path as a union activist. Clara's story is accentuated by Sweet's vivid illustrations, many of which are presented on fabric scraps or torn paper with borders of machine stitching. Particularly riveting is a bird's-eye view of a factory floor filled with hundreds of workers set opposite a series of spot illustrations highlighting some of the dreadful conditions the women endured (including being locked in during the day -- the cause of the horrific Triangle shirtwaist factory fire deaths). For those wanting to know more, an author's note and source notes follow the story. monica edinger

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2013 February #1)

When immigrant Clara Lemlich arrived in New York City, she was "dirt poor, just five feet tall, and hardly a word of English," but she wasn't short on tenacity and determination. After becoming employed as a garment worker and witnessing firsthand the deplorable factory conditions, she began to organize her fellow workers. Markel doesn't sugarcoat the obstacles and injuries Lemlich faced as she went on to lead the "largest walkout of women workers in U.S. history." Sweet incorporates images of assorted fabrics and stitch patterns into her tender illustrations, brightening the lives of workers whose reality was bleak. Author's agent: Anna Olswanger, Liza Dawson Associates. Ages 4–8. (Feb.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2013 January)

K-Gr 3—This picture-book biography of Clara Lemlich, a spitfire who fought hard for better working conditions, is an engaging, informative introduction to her activism as well as to the deplorable state of the U.S. garment industry in the early 1900s. Ukrainian-born Lemlich came to the United States with her parents to escape the Kishinev pogrom of 1903, only to be thrust into another appalling nightmare: the American shirtwaist factories. She began on a small scale to encourage her coworkers to strike, but at a union meeting, when even men wouldn't call for a walkout, she rose and shouted to the large gathering that the time for a strike was now, inspiring tens of thousands of women to leave their stations in the factories. Markel's style is clean and clear, making Lemlich's story accessible to a young audience. Readers are treated to solid information with a buoyant message about standing up for what is right. Sweet has created an outstanding backdrop for Markel's text with a vibrant collage of watercolor, gouache, blank dress-pattern paper, bookkeeping pages, stitches, and fabric pieces. This spirited account concludes with additional material on the garment industry and a solid bibliography. A first purchase.—Alyson Low, Fayetteville Public Library, AR

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