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A Dragon's Guide to Making Your Human Smarter
Contributor(s): Yep, Laurence, Ryder, Joanne, GrandPre, Mary (Illustrator)
ISBN: 038539232X     ISBN-13: 9780385392327
Publisher: Crown Pub
    OUR PRICE: $15.30  
Product Type: Hardcover - Other Formats
Published: March 2016
Qty:
Annotation: When Miss Drake enrolls her dear human pet, Winnie, in The Spriggs Academy, an extraordinary school for humans and magicals alike, the feisty girl makes new friends and frenemies while outmaneuvering a kidnapping plot. Co-written by the Newbery Honor-winning author of the Isabelle American Girl stories. Simultaneous eBook.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Schools; Fiction.
Dragons; Fiction.
Magic; Fiction.
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | Fantasy & Magic
- Juvenile Fiction | Animals | Mythical
- Juvenile Fiction | Humorous Stories
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: 2015010892
Lexile Measure: 790
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 4-6, Age 9-11
Series: Dragon's Guide
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 8.75" H x 6.00" W x 1.25" (0.95 lbs) 294 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 181551
Reading Level: 5.4   Interest Level: Middle Grades   Point Value: 9.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2016 Fall)
Winnie is newly enrolled in a magic academy. But Nanette, niece of Winnie's dragon-caretaker's "self-proclaimed rival," is also attending--and proclaims herself Winnie's rival. Lighthearted episodes of unusual lessons and field trips, illustrated by winsome spot art, are grounded by more serious encounters with Winnie's grandfather's goons in this buoyant second entry (A Dragon's Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans).

Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2016 #2)
Newly admitted to Spriggs Academy, Winnie Burton has more to contend with than the usual new-girl jitters. Winnie's dragon-caretaker, Miss Drake, enrolled Winnie so she could learn magic, but Miss Drake's "self-proclaimed rival," the sorceress Silana Voisin, has a niece, Nanette, attending Spriggs, and Nanette has decided to be Winnie's self-proclaimed rival. Nanette invites Winnie to be her stage assistant at the Halloween Festival magic show, but is her niceness a ruse to hide a mean trick? Even worse, Winnie's grandfather Jarvis wants to kidnap her and make her the heir to his ill-gotten empire, and his goons are stalking the school. While the previous book (A Dragon's Guide to the Care and Feeding of Humans, rev. 3/15) was told from Miss Drake's perspective, this second Dragon's Guide alternates between Winnie's and Miss Drake's points of view, the better to represent their more united front against the problems they face in this volume—not least the question of when to let Winnie's mother in on the secret of a dragon living in the basement of their San Francisco mansion. Lighthearted episodes of unusual school lessons and field trips, illustrated by GrandPré's winsome spot art, are grounded by Miss Drake's more serious encounters with the goons, but in the end it's Winnie's street smarts that get Grandfather Jarvis to ease up a little—a gratifying development as this buoyant, fantastical series continues. anita l. burkam

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2016 February)

Gr 4–6—In this second book in the series about a grand dragon and her human "pet," Miss Drake sends Winnie to Spriggs Academy, where the students are a mixture of regular kids, known as "naturals," and "magicals," kids ranging from young enchanters to werewolves to centaurs. Faculty members include a witch, a bird lady, and Sir Isaac Newton. Familiar school-based plot elements of bullies, class excursions, and talent shows take on new twists with magical elements thrown in. There's also a fun blend of magic and modern technology: Miss Drake the dragon is a frequent user of text messaging. Along with the school antics, Winnie faces other challenges: she must reveal the secret world of magic to her oblivious mother and survive a kidnapping plot by her evil grandpa. The girl handles everything just fine, with determination, curiosity, and a kind heart, along with occasional use of handy magical objects. While Winnie's triumphs neatly demonstrate that personal qualities are as valuable as natural-born magic, her easy success feels rather anticlimactic. She charms her greedy, power-hungry grandfather, as well as the school bully, with offers of friendship, and her mother's acceptance of the world of magic occurs with even less drama. Winnie's straightforward narration alternates with passages from Miss Drake, whose wry tone adds light humor to the story. An appealing black-and-white drawing opens each chapter. VERDICT A solid choice for readers new to fantasy and those who like gentle adventures with a touch of humor.—Steven Engelfried, Wilsonville Public Library, OR

[Page 88]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2016 March)

Gr 4–6—In this second book in the series about a grand dragon and her human "pet," Miss Drake sends Winnie to Spriggs Academy, where the students are a mixture of regular kids, known as "naturals," and "magicals," kids ranging from young enchanters to werewolves to centaurs. Faculty members include a witch, a bird lady, and Sir Isaac Newton. Familiar school-based plot elements of bullies, class excursions, and talent shows take on new twists with magical elements thrown in. There's also a fun blend of magic and modern technology: Miss Drake the dragon is a frequent user of text messaging. Along with the school antics, Winnie faces other challenges: she must reveal the secret world of magic to her oblivious mother and survive a kidnapping plot by her evil grandpa. The girl handles everything just fine, with determination, curiosity, and a kind heart, along with occasional use of handy magical objects. While Winnie's triumphs neatly demonstrate that personal qualities are as valuable as natural-born magic, her easy success feels rather anticlimactic. She charms her greedy, power-hungry grandfather, as well as the school bully, with offers of friendship, and her mother's acceptance of the world of magic occurs with even less drama. Winnie's straightforward narration alternates with passages from Miss Drake, whose wry tone adds light humor to the story. An appealing black-and-white drawing opens each chapter. VERDICT A solid choice for readers new to fantasy and those who like gentle adventures with a touch of humor.—Steven Engelfried, Wilsonville Public Library, OR

[Page 88]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.