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The Boy Who Cried Wolf
Contributor(s): Hennessy, B. G., Kulikov, Boris (Illustrator)
ISBN: 0689874332     ISBN-13: 9780689874338
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
    OUR PRICE: $16.20  
Product Type: School And Library - Other Formats
Published: March 2006
Qty:
Annotation: Hennessy's retelling of this timeless fable is infused with fanciful whimsy through Kulikov's hilarious and ingenious illustrations. This tale is sure to leave readers grinning sheepishly. Full color.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Fables.
Folklore.
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | Fairy Tales & Folklore
Dewey: 398.2
LCCN: 2004021672
Academic/Grade Level: Kindergarten, Ages 5-6
Book type: Easy Fiction
Physical Information: 10.25" H x 9.00" W x 0.50" (0.95 lbs) 32 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 105219
Reading Level: 2.7   Interest Level: Lower Grades   Point Value: 0.5
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
"Nothing ever happens here," the shepherd thinks. But the bored boy knows what would be exciting: He cries that a wolf is after his sheep, and the town's people come running. How often can that trick work, though?

B.G. Hennessy's retelling of this timeless fable is infused with fanciful whimsy through Boris Kulikov's hilarious and ingenious illustrations. This tale is sure to leave readers grinning sheepishly.


Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2006 Fall)
Hennessy spins out Aesop's brief fable with dialogue and other details, but more effective are Kulikov's energetic watercolor and gouache visualizations. The villagers' garb spans centuries (one scene sports armor, a top hat, and baseball caps) and the bemused sheep join dutifully in their foolish keeper's games. Despite a happy ending, those wolves are plenty frightening--Aesop's fable still has teeth. Copyright 2006 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2006 #2)
Hennessy spins out Aesop's brief fable with dialogue ("'I am SO bored,' he thought. 'All day long all I do is watch sheep...Well, what would be exciting? I know!'") and other details (the shepherd falsely claims first one wolf, then two; finally, three actual wolves appear). More effective than such minor embroideries are Kulikov's energetic watercolor and gouache visualizations, in which the villagers' garb spans centuries (one scene sports armor, a top hat, and baseball caps) and the bemused sheep (bug-eyed and neurotic looking but -- as it develops -- not without resource) join dutifully in their foolish keeper's games. The shepherd -- his rotund form exaggerated by toddlerlike proportions -- is seen from such close and dynamic perspectives that he fairly bursts from the page. Kulikov also provides the gentle conclusion: while the boy vainly seeks his sheep, they have bolted away together and are safely (and amusingly) perched in a tree. But despite the happy ending, those wolves are plenty frightening -- Aesop's fable still has teeth. Copyright 2006 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2006 January #3)

Hennessy (Claire and the Unicorn Happy Ever After , reviewed below) and Kulikov (Morris the Artist ) retell a well-known story with humorous verve. Kulikov slyly sets the scene in a Renaissance Italian landscape. He pictures the shoeless shepherd chewing on a stem; lazy butterflies, birds and dragonflies flit about. Hennessy's conversational style meanwhile brings the 16th-century peasant into present-day focus: " 'I am so bored,' he thought. 'All day long all I do is watch sheep.....'Munch, munch, munch. Baaaaaaaaaaaaa , answered the sheep." When the dullness overwhelms him, he runs to the village, yelling, "There is a wolf after my sheep!" The townspeople arrive en masse and span several centuries, from a knight to a musketeer to 19th-century city-folk in top hats. "That was a fun afternoon," thinks the shepherd, playing leapfrog with a friend who stays behind. Needless to say, he succeeds a second time, but his third effort (in earnest) fails to draw a crowd. Kulikov depicts the wolves as a fearsome hydra, but the boy's punishment is not too severe; the book ends wordlessly, with a spread revealing that the resourceful sheep have clambered up a tree. Hennessy's economic prose repeats key phrases for emphasis, while Kulikov composes comic close-ups with steep perspectives as the intensity heightens. Their shepherd misbehaves, but he's not so bad--he just wants a little excitement. Ages 3-7. (Mar.)

[Page 63]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2006 March)

PreS-Gr 2 -Aesop's "The Shepherd Boy and the Wolf" is given new life in this imaginative picture book. The story begs to be read aloud, and the large, colorful, and amusing watercolor-and-gouache paintings are perfect for group viewing. The traditional plot has been expanded to include some catchy refrains: "Munch, munch, munch. Baaaaaaaaaaaaa, answered the sheep," and "They looked everywhere for the wolf. No wolf in the pasture. No wolf on the hill. No wolf in the forest." These sheep have big expressive eyes and play leapfrog and put on blindfolds, and boys ride them. Instead of just one, there are three snarling, famished-looking creatures that finally appear when the shepherd boy cries wolf for a third time. The illustrations show an outlandish village with skyscrapers located on what appears to be a plateau in a landscape that is dotted with conical hills and a funny, discordant mix of townspeople that includes a knight running in his armor, women wearing mesh stockings and high lace boots, one man wearing a top hat and another a helmet with fluffy feathers on the top, one with a musketeer hat, and another a baseball cap. Each one is holding a weapon: the usual rakes and shovels, an umbrella, a baseball bat, and even a barber pole. The story ends with a fanciful twist, and the moral is understood but not included. A clever take on an old favorite.-Kirsten Cutler, Sonoma Library, CA

[Page 208]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.