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Kit & Kaboodle
Contributor(s): Wells, Rosemary
ISBN: 1250130751     ISBN-13: 9781250130754
Publisher: Henry Holt Books for Young Readers
    OUR PRICE: $16.20  
Product Type: School And Library
Published: May 2018
Qty:
Annotation: A new preschool picture book series by the creator of the Max and Ruby books features three short stories introducing Siamese twin cats Kit and Kaboodle, who routinely land in trouble that is actually caused by a mischievous red-capped mouse hiding on every spread.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Cats; Fiction.
Mice; Fiction.
Twins; Fiction.
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | Animals | Cats
- Juvenile Fiction | Family | Siblings
Dewey: [E]
LCCN: bl2018056178
Academic/Grade Level: Kindergarten, Ages 5-6
Series: Kit & Kaboodle
Book type: Easy Fiction
Physical Information: 10.30" H x 10.30" W x 0.40" (1.00 lbs)
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2018 May)

PreS-K—An odd offering from the prolific Wells. Three short tales feature twin kittens, Kit and Kaboodle (K&K), their parents, and a devious little mouse named Spinka. In the first story, the twins get socks from their grandma, but the sneaky rodent steals the socks from the washing machine. In the second, she swipes baseballs from the bag right before Kit and Kaboodle go play baseball with their dad, and then makes off with a muffin mysteriously called "blimpie." In the third, the critter uses up all of Mama Cat's Parisian bubble bath during K&K's bathtime and uses their electric toothbrush. As "Kit and Kaboodle never made any trouble," they aren't blamed for any of Spinka's doings. The feline family members hardly notice the mouse's misdeeds or the mouse, which makes her acts strangely passive aggressive—Spinka mostly gets mad about being excluded when the cats don't even seem to know she exists. This indifference makes her seem like an imaginary character, but alas she appears to be a real, if somewhat boring, nuisance. Wells's signature illustrations feature wide-eyed almost invariably smiling characters. Frames, word balloons, and solid-colored backgrounds make some pages feel cluttered. VERDICT These bland and largely pointless tales lack Wells's usual deft touch at understanding and depicting compelling and realistic child behavior. A supplementary purchase at best.—Yelena Alekseyeva-Popova, formerly at Chappaqua Library, NY

Copyright 2018 School Library Journal.