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Letter to My Daughter 1 Edition
Contributor(s): Angelou, Maya
ISBN: 1400066123     ISBN-13: 9781400066124
Publisher: Random House Inc
    OUR PRICE: $22.50  
Product Type: Hardcover - Other Formats
Published: September 2008
Qty:
Annotation: "Letter to My Daughter" is Angelou's first original collection in 10 years. Combining personal experiences with the distilled knowledge of a lifetime, these short but spellbinding essays take the reader on an inspirational journey that explores ideas from a well-lived life.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Authors, American; Homes and haunts; New York (State); New York.
African American authors; Biography.
Authors, American; 20th century; Biography.
BISAC Categories:
- Biography & Autobiography | Cultural Heritage
Dewey: 818/.5409
LCCN: 2008028843
Academic/Grade Level: General Adult
Book type: Non-Fiction
Physical Information: 8.75" H x 6.00" W x 0.75" (0.75 lbs) 166 pages
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
For a world of devoted readers, a much-awaited new volume of absorbing stories and inspirational wisdom from one of our best-loved writers.
Dedicated to the daughter she never had but sees all around her, "Letter to My Daughter" reveals Maya Angelou's path to living well and living a life with meaning. Told in her own inimitable style, this book transcends genres and categories: guidebook, memoir, poetry, and pure delight.
Here in short spellbinding essays are glimpses of the tumultuous life that led Angelou to an exalted place in American letters and taught her lessons in compassion and fortitude: how she was brought up by her indomitable grandmother in segregated Arkansas, taken in at thirteen by her more worldly and less religious mother, and grew to be an awkward, six-foot-tall teenager whose first experience of loveless sex paradoxically left her with her greatest gift, a son.
Whether she is recalling such lost friends as Coretta Scott King and Ossie Davis, extolling honesty, decrying vulgarity, explaining why becoming a Christian is a "lifelong endeavor," or simply singing the praises of a meal of red rice-Maya Angelou writes from the heart to millions of women she considers her extended family.
Like the rest of her remarkable work, "Letter to My Daughter" entertains and teaches; it is a book to cherish, savor, re-read, and share.


"I gave birth to one child, a son, but I have thousands of daughters. You are Black and White, Jewish and Muslim, Asian, Spanish speaking, Native Americans and Aleut. You are fat and thin and pretty and plain, gay and straight, educated and unlettered, and I am speaking to you all. Here is my offering to you."
-from "Letter toMy Daughter"


Contributor Bio(s): Maya Angelou was raised in Stamps, Arkansas. In addition to her bestselling autobiographies, including I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings and The Heart of a Woman, she wrote numerous volumes of poetry, among them Phenomenal Woman, And Still I Rise, On the Pulse of Morning, and Mother. Maya Angelou died in 2014.

Reviewed by PW Annex Reviews (Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews)
From the mellifluous voice of a venerable American icon comes her first original collection of writing to be published in ten years, anecdotal vignettes drawn from a compelling life and written in Angelou's erudite prose. Beginning with her childhood, Angelou acknowledges her own inauguration into daughterhood in "Philanthropy," recalling the first time her mother called her "my daughter." Angelou becomes a mother herself at an early age, after a meaningless first sexual experience: "Nine months later I had a beautiful baby boy. The birth of my son caused me to develop enough courage to invent my life." Fearlessly sharing amusing, if somewhat embarrassing, moments in "Senegal," the mature Angelou is cosmopolitan but still capable of making a mistake: invited to a dinner party while visiting the African nation, Angelou becomes irritated that none of the guests will step on a lovely carpet laid out in the center of the room, so she takes it upon herself to cross the carpet, only to discover the carpet is a table cloth that had been laid out in honor of her visit. The wisdom in this slight volume feels light and familiar, but it's also earnest and offered with warmth. (Sept.)