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Hey, Duck BRDBK Edition
Contributor(s): Bramsen, Carin
ISBN: 1524715816     ISBN-13: 9781524715816
Publisher: Random House Childrens Books
    OUR PRICE: $7.20  
Product Type: Board Book
Published: January 2017
Qty:
Annotation: An adorable little duckling is trying to befriend another "duck," but the plucky duckling is oblivious to the fact that his potential pal is, in fact, a cat that just wants to be left alone.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Board books.
Ducks; Fiction.
Cats; Fiction.
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | Animals | Cats
- Juvenile Fiction | Animals | Ducks, Geese, Etc.
- Juvenile Fiction | Social Issues | Friendship
Dewey: [E]
LCCN: bl2017000063
Academic/Grade Level: Kindergarten, Ages 5-6
Series: Duck and Cat Tale
Book type: Easy Fiction
Physical Information: 7.50" H x 6.00" W x 1.00" (0.76 lbs)
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2013 Fall)
In this droll rhyming conversation, a duckling mistakes a cat for another duck and pesters it to play. The cat isn't interested: "Will you please note that I'm a cat. / I want to be alone, so scat!" Soon the kitty realizes it misses the friend-seeking duckling after all. The soft-focus illustrations capture the personality--and adorable fuzziness--of each critter.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2013 February #3)

Bramsen (The Yellow Tutu) introduces an enthusiastically oblivious duckling who believes the cat he meets is a duck. The concept and rhyming exchange between the characters should tickle preschoolers, who will love feeling smarter than the duckling: "Hey, duck! Why do you walk like that?/ I slink because I am a cat./ Hey, duck! Why is your tail so long?/ Oh, please don't call me duck. It's wrong." However, the cat, as aloof as Greta Garbo, wants to be alone, and sends the duckling packing. Bramsen's artwork has a fluffy, dreamy, and almost three-dimensional quality that excels at expressing the characters' shock, dismay, delight, or surprise. In a gratifying if somewhat mystifying turn, the cat has a change of heart and seeks out the duckling, telling him, "My sense of me has gone amuck!/ I'm pretty sure I am a duck./ I'm not a cat, this much I know./ For no real cat could miss you so." Despite the odd turnaround, readers will enjoy the unlikely friends' realization that, feathers or fur, it makes no difference when it comes to fun. Ages 3–7. Agent: Marietta Zacker, Nancy Gallt Literary Agency. (Jan.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Reviewed by PW Annex Reviews (Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews)

Bramsen (The Yellow Tutu) introduces an enthusiastically oblivious duckling who believes the cat he meets is a duck. The concept and rhyming exchange between the characters should tickle preschoolers, who will love feeling smarter than the duckling: "Hey, duck! Why do you walk like that?/ I slink because I am a cat./ Hey, duck! Why is your tail so long?/ Oh, please don't call me duck. It's wrong." However, the cat, as aloof as Greta Garbo, wants to be alone, and sends the duckling packing. Bramsen's artwork has a fluffy, dreamy, and almost three-dimensional quality that excels at expressing the characters' shock, dismay, delight, or surprise. In a gratifying if somewhat mystifying turn, the cat has a change of heart and seeks out the duckling, telling him, "My sense of me has gone amuck!/ I'm pretty sure I am a duck./ I'm not a cat, this much I know./ For no real cat could miss you so." Despite the odd turnaround, readers will enjoy the unlikely friends' realization that, feathers or fur, it makes no difference when it comes to fun. Ages 3–7. Agent: Marietta Zacker, Nancy Gallt Literary Agency. (Jan.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2013 January)

PreS-Gr 1—The "duck" of the title is actually a cat, a fact that children will immediately recognize. But the duckling calling out to the feline still insists on calling it a duck and wanting to be friends. In spite of his persistent badgering, the cat politely refuses to join the little guy in dancing the puddle stomp. But after napping, the cat suddenly has a change of heart and decides to befriend the duckling after all. Bramsen's rhyming text is accompanied by bright illustrations in a pastoral setting. The detailed drawings are lovely-every blade of grass, flower petal, piece of tree bark, drop of splashed water, yellow fuzz on the duckling, and strand of white, black, and brown fur on the cat is meticulously rendered. Duckling displays several priceless facial expressions, although the cat doesn't look nearly as annoyed as it sounds. However, the story is slight, and the cat's decision to become the duckling's playmate is unconvincing. An additional offering.—Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT

[Page 75]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.