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A Young Patriot
ISBN: 9780395900192
Author: Murphy, Jim
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Published: March 1998
Retail: $7.95    OUR PRICE: $1.99
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Binding Type: Paperback
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Annotation: Jim Murphy lets Joseph Plumb Martin speak for himself throughout the text, weaving in historical background details wherever necessary, giving voice to a teenager who was an eyewitness to the fight that set America free from the British Empire.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Nonfiction | History | United States
Library of Congress Subjects:
Soldiers; Connecticut; Biography; Juvenile literature.
Soldiers.
Dewey: 973.3/446
LCCN: 93038789
Lexile Measure: 1140
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 4-6, Age 9-11
Book type: Juvenile Non-Fiction
BISAC category: JUVENILE NONFICTION / History / United States / Colonial & R
Target Age Group: Age 9-11
Target Grade: Grade 4-6
Grade level: Grade 4-6
Physical Information: 0.50" H x 50.00" L x 8.00" W
Lexile Level: 1140
Bargain Category: Middle School, Historical Fiction, Growing Up, Biographies, Reference, Social Issues, Upper Elementary
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 20248
Reading Level: 7.7   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 3.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q15793
Reading Level: 7.8   Interest Level: Grades 3-5   Point Value: 6.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
In the summer of 1776, Joseph Plumb Martin was a fifteen-year-old Connecticut farm boy who considered himself "as warm a patriot as the best of them." He enlisted that July and stayed in the revolutionary army until hostilities ended in 1783. Martin fought under Washington, Lafayette, and Steuben. He took part in major battles in New York, Monmouth, and Yorktown. He wintered at Valley Forge and then at Morristown, considered even more severe. He wrote of his war years in a memoir that brings the American Revolution alive with telling details, drama, and a country boy's humor. Jim Murphy lets Joseph Plumb Martin speak for himself throughout the text, weaving in historical backfround details wherever necessary, giving voice to a teenager who was an eyewitness to the fight that set America free from the British Empire.

Contributor Bio(s):
Jim Murphy is the author of An American Plague, which received the Sibert Medal and a Newbery Honor and was selected as a National Book Award finalist. His Clarion titles include THE BOYS' WAR and other award-winning nonfiction as well as a picture book, FERGUS AND THE NIGHT-DEMON. He lives in Maplewood, New Jersey, with his family. For more information visit www.jimmurphybooks.com.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 1996)
Using Joseph Plumb Martin's first person account of his participation in the Revolutionary War as primary source material, Murphy intertwines this story of one teenager's life as a soldier with broader information about the Revolution, to put Martin's story in context. The handsome, informative, and fascinating look at American history is illustrated with many period reproductions. Bib., ind. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Guide Reviews
Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 1996 #5)
Illustrated with reproductions. Joseph Plumb Martin enlisted in the Connecticut militia in 1776 as a sixteen-year-old. Using Martin's first-person account of his participation in the Revolutionary War as his primary source, Murphy tells the story of one teenager's life as a soldier. Murphy weaves Martin's story into a broader tale, giving background about the causes of the Revolution and providing an account of the unfolding of the war, the significant battles, and the war's end. As he has in previous books, the author shows a talent for choosing and explicating details that make history both personal and fascinating. The description of the winter at Valley Forge includes the fact that the soldiers were too tired and hungry even to build themselves shelter from the cold; Washington had to bribe the soldiers by offering a prize of twelve dollars to the group who finished building a hut first. The informative text is peppered with quotations and illustrated with many period reproductions, maps, and diagrams. These, in conjunction with a chronology of the American Revolution and an extensive bibliography, complete Murphy's intriguing account. m.v.k. Copyright 1998 Horn Book Magazine Reviews
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 1996 June)
Gr 6 Up Murphy presents the life of Joseph Plumb Martin, a 15-year-old Connecticut farm boy who enlisted in the Continental Army in 1776. Through well-selected quotes from Martin's self-published memoir, A Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier, readers experience the young soldier's excitement and fear during battle, his boredom while marching, and the deprivation of a winter encampment. The author's compelling writing intertwines major events of the American Revolution with Martin's own story, rendering historical events and military strategy readily comprehensible. The book is generously illustrated with black-and-white maps and reproductions; captions present information that complements rather than repeats the text. Unfortunately, there is neither a map of the colonies from the Hudson to Yorktown, nor a glossary of military terms. Important figures such as Burgoyne, Cornwallis, and Washington are portrayed as individuals as well as military leaders. The index is comprehensive. This volume compares favorably to Doris and Harold Faber's The Birth of a Nation (Scribners, 1989) and is certainly more accessible than Yankee Doodle Boy (Holiday, 1995), an abridged version of Martin's memoir edited by George F. Scheer. An outstanding example of history brought to life through the experience of one individual. Lisa Von Drasek, Brooklyn Public Library Copyright 1998 School Library Journal Reviews